Protecting renters

Problems arising from rental relationships can be especially upsetting when the home becomes an extension of the day's frustrations, rather than a refuge from them. Some landlords neglect maintenance, while others habitually enter without notice. Even those fortunate enough to avoid major issues may sometimes find it difficult to recover the security deposit. Although landlords often have the upper hand, tenants may still come out on top if they are savvy, informed consumers.

  1. If you have never met a potential landlord in person: a) never send them money by wire transfer, and b) never give them private financial information (such as your social security number, bank account numbers, credit card numbers). Beware any potential landlord who makes such requests.1
  2. Carefully inspect the exact unit that you want to rent, not just a model unit. Open every door and closet, note any odd smells or noises, check for deadbolt locks, and confirm there are adequate exits in case of emergency.
  3. Read the lease contract carefully to make sure you can live with everything that is (or isn't) there. If the landlord makes additional promises, they need to be written on the lease document before signing. Never rent without signing a lease.2
  4. Take video and/or photos of the unit during the walk-through with the landlord. The more photos, the better—if your landlord later tries to withhold your security deposit for existing damage, you will have proof that you were not responsible for it.3  
  5. Buy renter's insurance whether or not the landlord requires it, and make sure it is “replacement cost” insurance. A typical policy may cost anywhere from $10-30/month, and could even be less inexpensive if bundled with a car or life insurance policy.4
  6. Do not allow your landlord to violate your right to notice before entry. Most jurisdictions require at least 24 hours notice before the landlord may enter—knowing the law in your area will make it easier for you to protect your privacy.
  7. Tell your landlord to make repairs. Landlords are required to provide basic amenities of habitability, which typically includes heat, water, electricity, cleanliness, and safety. If talking to the landlord isn't going anywhere, you may be able to remedy the situation by withholding a portion of the rent, calling the building inspector, or breaking the lease and moving out without penalty.
  8. If you need help with your specific situation, get free legal advice from your local branch of the Legal Services Corporation—they frequently specialize in landlord-tenant questions.

Additional Resources:

Student PIRGs: Renter's Rights       
Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD): Tenant Rights

State-specific consumer guides for tenants:

Sources:

  1. FTC Consumer Website: http://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0079-rental-listing-scams 
  2. HUD Renter's Guide: Ten Tips for Tenants: http://www.hud.gov/local/shared/working/r8/mf/topten.cfm?state=nd 
  3. NYC.gov Rental Tips Website: http://www.nyc.gov/html/dob/html/homeowners_and_tenants/renter_tips.shtml
  4. HUD Renter's Guide: Ten Tips for Tenants: http://www.hud.gov/local/shared/working/r8/mf/topten.cfm?state=nd

Issue updates

News Release | U.S. PIRG Education Fund | Consumer Protection

Coronavirus worry triggers most surgical mask, sanitizer prices to spike at least 50% on Amazon

As the Coronvirus outbreak became more widespread, the price of most of the sanitizers and masks rose at least 50 percent higher than the 90-day average. Even one in six products sold directly by Amazon saw prices rise at least 50 percent higher in February

> Keep Reading
News Release | U.S. PIRG Education Fund | Consumer Protection

Trader Joe's jumps to top of food recall notification rankings

Following the release last month of U.S. PIRG’s Education Fund’s Food Recall Failure report, which rated 26 top grocery store chains on their transparency about food recalls, Trader Joe's provided new survey answers and clarified where that information lives online and in its stores.

> Keep Reading
Report | U.S. PIRG Education Fund | Consumer Protection, Food

Food Recall Failure

Our research found the majority of grocery stores fail to warn the public about hazardous food recalls. While they collect significant information about Americans shopping habits to sell us more food, they aren't doing enough to use that information to protect the public health.

> Keep Reading
News Release | U.S. PIRG Education Fund | Consumer Protection, Food

New investigation: Supermarkets failing to warn public about food recalls

Americans are not hearing about food recalls, and that communication breakdown is having serious repercussions for public health. A new report finds that most grocery stores -- which should be one of the best places to learn about recalls -- don’t make it easy for consumers to uncover this information.

> Keep Reading

Pages

News Release | U.S. PIRG Education Fund | Consumer Protection

Coronavirus worry triggers most surgical mask, sanitizer prices to spike at least 50% on Amazon

As the Coronvirus outbreak became more widespread, the price of most of the sanitizers and masks rose at least 50 percent higher than the 90-day average. Even one in six products sold directly by Amazon saw prices rise at least 50 percent higher in February

> Keep Reading
News Release | U.S. PIRG Education Fund | Consumer Protection

Trader Joe's jumps to top of food recall notification rankings

Following the release last month of U.S. PIRG’s Education Fund’s Food Recall Failure report, which rated 26 top grocery store chains on their transparency about food recalls, Trader Joe's provided new survey answers and clarified where that information lives online and in its stores.

> Keep Reading
News Release | U.S. PIRG Education Fund | Consumer Protection, Food

New investigation: Supermarkets failing to warn public about food recalls

Americans are not hearing about food recalls, and that communication breakdown is having serious repercussions for public health. A new report finds that most grocery stores -- which should be one of the best places to learn about recalls -- don’t make it easy for consumers to uncover this information.

> Keep Reading
News Release | U.S. PIRG | Consumer Protection

Hack doesn’t absolve Equifax of being careless with consumers’ data

Congress must hold companies accountable for failing to protect condumers' confidential information.

> Keep Reading

Pages

Report | U.S. PIRG Education Fund | Consumer Protection, Food

Food Recall Failure

Our research found the majority of grocery stores fail to warn the public about hazardous food recalls. While they collect significant information about Americans shopping habits to sell us more food, they aren't doing enough to use that information to protect the public health.

> Keep Reading
Report | Environment America Research & Policy Center and U.S. PIRG Education Fund | Consumer Protection

Electric Buildings

To prevent air and water pollution and the worst impacts of global warming, America must move toward meeting its energy needs with 100 percent renewable energy. Getting there will require that we get the most out of every bit of energy we use – and that we end the burning of fossil fuels in our homes and commercial buildings.

> Keep Reading
Report | U.S. PIRG Education Fund and Consumers for Auto Reliability And Safety (CARS) Foundation | Consumer Protection

Unsafe used cars for sale

AutoNation, which bills itself as “America’s Largest Auto Retailer,” is selling recalled used vehicles that contain dangerous safety defects. In a survey of over 2,400 used vehicles for sale at 28 AutoNation locations, 1 in 9 were found to have unrepaired safety recalls.

> Keep Reading
Report | U.S.PIRG Education Fund and Kids In Danger | Consumer Protection

Recalled Infant Sleepers

Every day, millions of kids are dropped off at child care facilities across the country by parents and caretakers who are looking forward to seeing them safe and sound at the end of the day. But new research found some dangerous recalled products are still in use at child care facilities across the country.

> Keep Reading
Report | U.S. PIRG | Consumer Protection

You're Not Alone

While the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s new director entertains removing its consumer complaint database from public view, that website feature is proving its worth. The CFPB published a record 257,000 consumer complaints in 2018, according to a new report by U.S. PIRG Education Fund.

> Keep Reading

Pages

Blog Post | Consumer Protection

AutoNation: Stop selling recalled used cars, don’t spam | Adam Garber

When our new report revealed every single one of the 28 AutoNation dealerships we surveyed across the country was selling a recalled car with a dangerous safety defect you’d hope their response would be: “we’re on it.” It wasn't.

> Keep Reading
Blog Post | Consumer Protection

U.S. PIRG Consumer Campaign Director Testifies at Congressional Hearing on Data Security | Mike Litt

U.S. PIRG's Consumer Campaign Director, Mike Litt, was invited to testify at a Congressional hearing yesterday about improving data security at the credit bureaus. Here are his opening remarks. 

> Keep Reading
Blog Post | Consumer Protection

Update to How You Can Change Your Experian Credit Freeze PIN | Mike Litt

Our consumer campaign director provides an update to how you can change your Experian credit freeze PIN after a security flaw was discovered two weeks ago.

> Keep Reading
Blog Post | Public Health, Consumer Protection

Ten year anniversary of safer school supplies: Happy Birthday, CPSIA! | Kara Cook-Schultz

Landmark consumer legislation has had a monumental effect on protecting kids’ health.

> Keep Reading
Blog Post | Consumer Protection

ID Theft & Privacy Checklists | Mike Litt

Today, we're releasing our revamped Identity Theft and Online Privacy resources.

> Keep Reading

Pages

News Release | U.S. PIRG Education Fund

As the Coronvirus outbreak became more widespread, the price of most of the sanitizers and masks rose at least 50 percent higher than the 90-day average. Even one in six products sold directly by Amazon saw prices rise at least 50 percent higher in February

News Release | U.S. PIRG Education Fund

Following the release last month of U.S. PIRG’s Education Fund’s Food Recall Failure report, which rated 26 top grocery store chains on their transparency about food recalls, Trader Joe's provided new survey answers and clarified where that information lives online and in its stores.

Report | U.S. PIRG Education Fund

Our research found the majority of grocery stores fail to warn the public about hazardous food recalls. While they collect significant information about Americans shopping habits to sell us more food, they aren't doing enough to use that information to protect the public health.

News Release | U.S. PIRG Education Fund

Americans are not hearing about food recalls, and that communication breakdown is having serious repercussions for public health. A new report finds that most grocery stores -- which should be one of the best places to learn about recalls -- don’t make it easy for consumers to uncover this information.

View AllRSS Feed

Support us

Your tax-deductible donation supports U.S. PIRG Education Fund’s work to educate consumers on the issues that matter, and the powerful interests that are blocking progress.

Learn More

You can also support U.S. PIRG Education Fund’s work through bequests, contributions from life insurance or retirement plans, securities contributions and vehicle donations. 




U.S. PIRG Education Fund is part of The Public Interest Network, which operates and supports organizations committed to a shared vision of a better world and a strategic approach to getting things done.